Stuffed Bread Malpoa/Malpua

Malpua or Malpoa (in Bengali) is a popular Indian dessert, akin to a pancake, dipped in syrup. It is made around the country in different ways, especially during special occasions. The batter is usually made from flour, and flavoured with cardamom or fennel, deep-fried and then soaked in syrup. My Didu (maternal grandmother), was the ‘Malpua-maker’ in our family. And to be honest, in my experience, she was the best…

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I have never had malpuas as tasty as the ones she used to make; partly because she used wheat flour instead of all-purpose (atta in place of maida), that gave the malpuas a completely different depth of flavour, and crispiness. And then there was the secret ingredient she added….to which, I shall come to later.

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This September 16th marked the fourth anniversary of her death. I wanted to offer her a tribute, with food of course, because she, like me, was a biiig foodie. The menu was simple; we had a typical Bengali menu consisting of –

  • Aloo Korolar chochhori (bitter-gourd and potato melange)
  • Musoor dal (lentil soup)
  • Mochar ghonto (banana flower mish-mash)
  • Dim er jhal (Egg curry, made by dad)
  • Bhapa chicken (Steam-cooked chicken in mustard-coconut paste, made by mom)
  • Stuffed bread malpua (my speciaaaaaal 😛 )

So, you see, this was my special tribute to her; an adaptation of the regular Malpua, this Stuffed Bread Malpua is filled with grated coconut, nuts and is rich in flavour and taste. I remember my Mom’s aunt make something like this, many decades back. I suppose I remembered that, somewhere in the back of my mind 😛

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The process of making these Malpuas is quite easy, if a little lengthy. They store well too, so you can actually keep them for up to a week, IF they are not stolen by then 😉 For the filling, you can substitute the coconut with mawa/khoya if you wish for a richer tasting malpua.

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Like I said, if you want it to be richer, you can use a stuffing of khoya/mawa. You can also fry the whole thing in ghee, and make some rabri to go with it 🙂

Stuffed Bread Malpua

Ingredients:

For the Malpua:

  • Bread – 6 slices
  • Coconut – 1/2 cup approx, grated (plus a little for garnish)
  • Milk – 1/4 cup (adjust as needed)
  • Cashews – a handful
  • Raisins – a handful
  • Ghee – for frying

For the syrup:

  • Sugar – 1 cup
  • Water – 1/2 cup
  • Cardamom pods – 2
  • Saffron – a few strands

Method: stuffed-bread-malpua-7

  1. Prepare the syrup by heating a deep-bottomed vessel with water.
  2. Add the sugar, saffron and cardamom.
  3. Let it come to a rolling boil, and simmer until the syrup comes down to a one-string consistency.
  4. Keep aside.
  5. Crush the bread into a fine powder-like consistency (you may remove the crusts, I didn’t).
  6. To the powdered bread, add the milk, 1 tbsp at a time, until you’re able to knead the bread into a pliable dough.
  7. Once the bread has been kneaded into a smooth, soft dough, cover with a damp cloth and keep aside.
  8. Pluck out lemon-sized balls from the dough, and make smooth dough balls of each.
  9. Press the dough with your palms (you may roll it out too), into a flat circle.
  10. Place a spoonful of grated coconut, and a couple of raisins and cashews in the middle.
  11. Bring the edges of the circle together and join the ends, smoothing it out with some milk if needed.
  12. Repeat process with the remaining bread dough until you have tikki-shaped ‘malpuas’.
  13. When the bread tikkis are done, heat a pan with ghee (you may add oil too), and let it smoke.
  14. Bring down the heat, and keep the flame on low.
  15. Fry the malpuas on low flame, giving each side 2 mins approx, until they turn golden brown.
  16. Immediately remove, and dunk into the sugar syrup.
  17. Repeat process until all the malpuas have been dunked into syrup.
  18. Serve hot or cold, with a sprinkling of some freshly grated coconut on top.

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6 Comments Add yours

  1. Rimli says:

    A complete new style of Malpua Trisha and the little history makes us connected with the food.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you!!! 😀 I hope it’s not too much, I get quite talkative when it comes to such things..glad you like it Rimli! ❤

      Like

      1. Rimli says:

        It always gives the nostalgic vibe to me 😀

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Abhipsa says:

    That’s awesome… U r too good trisha

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank youuuuuu Abhipsa di!

      Like

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